Evening Jaunt Through Ellison

Ellison Park has the beauty of natural woodlands combined with steep slopes and the level flood plain of the Irondequoit Creek. It is one of Rochester’s most frequented but little understood parks.

History

Officially the first Monroe County Park, Ellison Park came into being in December of 1926. The county accepted approximately 200 acres of land from Mr. and Mrs. Frank T. Ellison in memory of Mr. Ellison’s father, Nathaniel. Ellison Park has been the hub of many historical events and locations. Indian Landing which was located on Irondequoit Creek, for many years was used by the indigenous Seneca as the beginning of the portage route which stretched along Ellison Park.

The Lost City of Tryon, originally founded in hopes of creating a commercial settlement, used the Irondequoit Creek for trade. A store was built that bartered with the Seneca Indians, beginning its trading roots.

http://www2.monroecounty.gov/parks-ellison.php

 

All photographs below taken by George Payne at Ellison Park in Rochester, NY.

 

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Fly Kites, Not Drones: a montage from the front lines of the international anti-drone movement

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Photo taken at vigil for victims of drone in Syracuse, NY

 

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Preliminary discussion between protestors and law enforcement
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Speeches by ;local anti-drone activists

 

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Federal, Military, State, City and County law enforcement attend

 

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Listen to the Broken Spear Vision every Sunday at 12:30 pm on 106. 3 FM

 

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Broken Spear Vision Interview with Judy Bello

 

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Political Theater at Hancock Airbase

 

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Vigil for Drone Victims in Syracuse, NY

 

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“A Timeless Voice”.  Photograph by George Payne taken outside the Lebanese Embassy in Washington.

 

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Drones are bad for all living creatures.

 

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Lines of Defense
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Sounds like a good idea to me

 

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Die-in at Hancock Airbase in Dewitt.

 

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George Payne

 

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Photo taken at the People Climate March in NYC on September 21, 2014

Abandoned Farm: A Gallery of Photographs by George Payne

Go with your love to the fields.
Lie down in the shade. Rest your head
in her lap. Swear allegiance
to what is nighest your thoughts.

Wendell Berry Podcast

 

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Main House
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The Trailer

 

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Milkweed

 

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Tools

 

 

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The Hitch

 

 

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The Three Trees by the Road

 

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 Coyotes

 

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The Cobblestone Remains

There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. – Wendell Berry

The Art of Protest

Photography by George Payne

 

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Alliance for Quality Education Rally at Albany State Capital

 

 

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Climate Change March

 

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Budding Photojournalists

 

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Hillary Clinton Primary Speech at MCC

 

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Climate Change March

 

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Animal Rights Protest at Brighton 12 Corners

 

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Anti Ringling Brothers Protest at Blue Cross Arena

 

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Climate Change March

 

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People’s Climate Change March in NYC

 

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Anti-Drone Vigil in Syracuse

 

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Anti-Drone Vigil in Syracuse

 

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Climate Change March

 

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Animal Rights Vigil at Brighton 12 Corners

 

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Anti-Drone Rally at Hancock Air Base

 

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Fight for $15 Rally at University of Rochester

 

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Michael Brown Supporter in St. Louis

 

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Civil Resistance at Ferguson Police Station

 

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Anti-Drone Rally at Hancock Air Base

 

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Anti-Drone Rally at Hancock Air Base

 

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George Payne at a rally in St. Louis

Ferguson As I Saw It

All Photographs Taken by George Payne

October 10-12, 2014

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Protestors outside the Ferguson Police Station

 

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The Line

 

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Civil Resistance

 

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Hands Up, Don’t Shoot

 

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Dred Scot’s St. Louis

 

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Battle Cry

 

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Dr. West in Action

 

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George Payne

 

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More Than Book Knowledge

 

 

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Sabbath

 

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Meeting Grounds

 

 

Flower City Street Art

The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.

                                                                                            Pablo Picasso

 

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St. Paul Blvd

 

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Record Archive

 

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Sibley Building

 

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Washington Square Park

 

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Lower Falls Park

 

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Mt. Hope Cemetery

 

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Nazareth College

 

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Highland Bowl

 

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Maplewood Rose Garden

 

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Finger Lakes Community College

 

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Hungerford Building

 

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University of Rochester River Campus

 

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Poet’s Garden in Highland Park

 

 

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On the Genesee Riverway Trail in the Plymouth Exchange Neighborhood

 

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Salvador Dali in the ABVI Building on South Clinton

 

 

 

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Finger Lakes Community College

 

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Eastman Theater on Gibbs Street

 

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Susan B. Anthony Historic Preservation District

 

 

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University of Rochester River Campus

 

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Genesee Valley Park

 

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Eastman Theater on Gibbs Street

Design & Democracy: A Photographic Gallery of Regional Works by Frederick Law Olmsted

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Photo by George Payne

Many people are familiar with the architectural and landscape design accomplishments of Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903). What many people do not know is that Frederick Law Olmsted was a brave journalist, correspondent, and intelligence analyst of sorts for the paper which would become the New York Times.  Decades before civil war broke out, Olmsted traveled to the Southern states, where he covered that region’s lifestyle, assessed the conditions of slaves on the plantations, and provided a honest look at a world most people living north of the Mason Dixie Line had never seen. Olmsted’s articles, essays, and other forms of communication were very influential in shaping public opinion against slavery.

Olmsted’s landscape designs reflect his deepest beliefs about the equality of all people. His works are testimonies to his belief that we all have an inherent right to gather in public spaces as free citizens. This was central to his artistic philosophy. Olmsted built parks which not only invited people to congregate, conversate, and communion with one another, he also designed spaces which would foster the feeling of democracy in the minds and bodies of visitors.

More than an architect, Olmsted was a visionary. He saw not only where America had come from, but where it was heading and why it needed to go there. He was not just a lover of plants and trees for their own sake. No mere preservationist. He was an artist who re-imagined the symbolic meaning of plants and trees, and he then turned them into emblems of civic virtue-namely, beauty, cooperation, growth, harmony, utility, regeneration, and hope. These were the virtues which Olmsted lived by, and every single one of his parks embodies these virtues in a way that continues to inspire people all over the world.

Olmsted once said, “The possession of arbitrary power has always, the world over, tended irresistibly to destroy humane sensibility, magnanimity, and truth.”

The power of his parks was always equal to the power of the people’s spirit. When people not only love and respect their own natural gifts, but love and respect the gifts of others because they are also part of nature, that is when we are truly ourselves. That is when we are truly American.

All Photographs by George Payne

 

 

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GVP

 

City of Rochester | Genesee Valley Park

Along with Highland and Seneca Parks, Genesee Valley Park was designed by Olmsted. Here, he showcased the naturally occurring, rolling pastoral fields of the area when he planned the 800+ acre park. A favorite spot for golfers, crew teams, kayakers, and cross-country skiers, Genesee Valley Park is one of the oldest parks in the area.

 

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GVP

 

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GVP
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Genesee Valley Park

 

 

As the father of our nation’s first municipal park, state park, and national park, Olmsted had his fingerprints all over the cultural and spiritual landscape of the American dream. The dream was that every human being would learn the simple joys of walking through a meadow, the boundless pleasures of contemplating ripples on the surface of a pond, listening to the melodies of finches and larches, and meeting an old friend or an interesting stranger under the canopy of hemlock leaves.

 

 

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 Highland Park | Monroe County, NY

 Highland Park is actually a completely planned—and planted—arboretum or “tree garden.” In addition to over 1200 lilac shrubs, the park boasts a Japanese Maple collection, 35 varieties of sweet-smelling magnolias, a barberry collection, a rock garden with dwarf evergreens, 700 varieties of rhododendron, azaleas, mountain laurel and andromeda, horse chestnuts, spring bulbs and wildflowers and a large number of trees. The park’s pansy bed features 10,000 plants, designed into an oval floral “carpet” with a new pattern each year.

http://www2.monroecounty.gov/parks-highland.php

 

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Highland Park

 

 

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Photo  by George Payne

 

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Hanging with Frederick

Parks Seneca Park Page | Monroe County, NY

 Olmsted designed this unique 297 acre park with the picturesque Genesee River in mind. Seneca Park provides three picnic shelters, the newly renovated Wegman Lodge, playgrounds, scenic views of the Genesee River gorge, hiking trails, open fields and large pond with a paved walking path.

 

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Trout Pond in Seneca Park

 

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View of Genesee River in Seneca Park

 

About Maplewood

The Maplewood neighborhood is unique among all city neighborhoods in combining the architectural grandeur of intact avenues, urban landscapes designed by the internationally acclaimed firm of Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr. and Company, and the natural beauty of the Lower Falls of the Genesee. 3 elements, our building environment, our landscaped environment, and our natural environment combined give Maplewood its enduring charm.

http://www.maplewood.org/about-maplewood/

 

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Maplewood Park Rose Garden Rest Rooms

 

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Volunteers cleaning Frederick Law Olmsted’s Maplewood Park

 

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View of gorge from Seneca Maplewood Pedestrian Bridge
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Lower Falls

America’s Oldest State Park | Niagara Falls State Park

 

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Niagara Falls by George Payne

 

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Niagara Falls

 

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Photo by George Payne

 

 

Burned Over: on the search for some of Rochester’s most sacred Christian sites

All photographs by George Cassidy Payne

 

Rochester was once at the center of the burned-over district. This refers to the western and central regions of New York in the early 19th century, where religious revivals and the formation of new religious movements of the Second Great Awakening took place.

From the beginning of Rochester’s incorporation as a city in 1837, it has been dominated by Christianity. The pictures below attempt to capture the beauty, power, reverence, social unity,  pomp, sobriety, dignity, humanitarianism, magic, materialism, mysticism, lightheartedness, and perhaps sublimity of this religious influence.

 

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All Faith and Deliverance Church on Brewer St
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Earth Vigil outside St. Luke and St. Cyrene
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Mt. Hope Cemetery
You cannot believe in God until you believe in yourself.
Swami Vivekananda

 

 

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Immaculate Conception/ St. Bridget’s Church in Corn Hill
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St. John Fisher College

 

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St. John Fisher

 

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St. Boniface Church

 

Just as a candle cannot burn without fire, men cannot live without a spiritual life.
Buddha

 

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Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School on 1100 South Goodman Street. A beacon on the hill for social justice.

 

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Mt. Hope Cemetery. Susan B. Anthony was a devout Quaker.

 

It is wonderful how much time good people spend fighting the devil. If they would only expend the same amount of energy loving their fellow men, the devil would die in his own tracks of ennui.
Helen Keller

 

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About First Universalist Church
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Mt. Hope Cemetery

 

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Maplewood YMCA by Claude Bragdon

 

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Clara Barton’s Church

 

There is nothing evil save that which perverts the mind and shackles the conscience.
Saint Ambrose

 

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Memorial AME on Clarissa Street. Once a site of the Underground Railroad

 

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Immanuel Baptist Temple by the Genesee Riverway Trail. Learn more about this congregation at Immanuel Baptist Church
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The goddess ISIS at Strasenburgh Planetarium

 

I love you when you bow in your mosque, kneel in your temple, pray in your church. For you and I are sons of one religion, and it is the spirit. Khalil Gibran

 

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Old Downtown Salvation Army Building
Religion kept some of my relatives alive, because it was all they had. If they hadn’t had some hope of heaven, some companionship in Jesus, they probably would have committed suicide, their lives were so hellish.
Octavia Butler

 

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Church on Plymouth Street in the Plymouth Exchange Neighborhood
Prayer does not change God, but it changes him who prays.
Soren Kierkegaard

 

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Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St.Simon Cyrene

http://www.twosaints.org/

 

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Mt. Hope Cemetery

 

I believe in a religion that believes in freedom. Any time I have to accept a religion that won’t let me fight a battle for my people, I say to hell with that religion.
Malcolm X

 

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King’s Landing Pioneer’s Cemetery

Learn More About King’s Landing

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Our Father…

Welcome Listeners to Another Episode of the Broken Spear Vision on Rochester Free Radio 106.3 FM

Rochester Free Radio is a community, non-commercial radio station run by volunteers to provide locally-focused, locally-created information, conversation and entertainment.  The goal of RFR is to help solidify the Rochester community by enjoying and celebrating our similarities and differences; our strengths and weaknesses; our ideas and curiosities.

Rochester Free Radio, was created by three members of the community, each with varying degrees of experience in broadcast radio and community activism.  Chuck McCoy, Jeff Moulton and Dave Sutliff-Atias recognized the need for opportunities for unheard individuals and groups to be heard by the rest of Rochester.

Rochester Free Radio broadcasts so that everyone in our community has the chance to interact and exchange ideas for the betterment of the entire community; in particular, those who do not presently have a voice in our local mainstream media.

http://www.rochesterfreeradio.com/

For the past year I have been recording taped and live podcasts on Rochester Free Radio. I call my show The Broken Spear Vision. It has a social justice theme and airs every Sunday at 12:30 pm on 106.3 FM.

Below are some pics and links to some of my past shows.

 

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Students from Walter Cooper School #10 with their teacher. They came on to talk about homelessness in Rochester.

 

Frank Regan Interview on Climate Change

 

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Dave and Rajesh talking shop in the RFR studio

Listen to Rajesh Barnabas

 

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RFR Studio at the Hungerford Building

 

Interview with domestic violence advocate Pamela Graham

 

 

 

Mara Ahmed Interview

Interview with Robin Dettman

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Imaginative Journalist David Kramer

Talker of the Town Talks on The Broken Spear Vision

 

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Mary Lupien Interview

 

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Anti War Activist Judy Bello

Listen to the Judy Bello Interview

 

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Climate Justice Educator Sue Hughes Smith

Interview with Sue Hughes Smith

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Housing Rights activists Julie Gelfand and Lucas Spencer

 

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My favorite interview so far

 

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Organic farmer Elizabeth Henderson

 

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https://www.facebook.com/rocfreeradio

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Scholar and illustrator George Dardess

 

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Gun Safety Advocate Gary Pudup

Interview with Matthew Nicoloff

Interview with Gary Pudup

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The Board

 

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George Payne, BSV host

A Footpath in Perinton

“The Crescent Trail is a system of footpaths within the Town of Perinton suitable for uses such as hiking, cross-country running, snowshoeing, nature study, and photography.  Approximately thirty-five miles of footpaths provide public access to wooded hills, Town parklands, scenic overlooks, the margins of wetlands, and other preserved open spaces. The Trail connects with the Erie Canal Heritage Trail and the RS&E Trolley Trail.

Most sections of the Crescent Trail are single-lane dirt pathways. A continuous, orange-blazed main trail is nearly completed – planned as a crescent-shaped route between the southwest and northeast quadrants of Perinton. Additional branch trails, loop trails, connecting paths, and access paths allow self-guided walks of up to two hours. Longer, half-day or day-long outings can be enjoyed as point to point hikes or by using connections with the Trolley Trail or Canal Trail.”

http://www.perinton.org/Departments/Parks/hikingctha/

 

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Photo by George Payne

 

Come forth into the light of things,
Let Nature be your teacher.
~William Wordsworth

 

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Photo by George Payne

 

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Photo by George Payne

I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in. ~John Muir (1838–1914)

 

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Photo by George Payne

To me a lush carpet of pine needles or spongy grass is more welcome than the most luxurious Persian rug. ~Helen Keller

 

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Photo by George Paune

 

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Photo by George Payne

 

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Photo by George Paune